World news

Aji’s Quest Concludes

AGA news - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 23:38

Aji’s Quest, the popular online comic about a quoll who plays go, has published its last panel, author Colette Bezio announced on July 5th.  Her comic strip was launched two years ago and has grown to 180 pages, and attracted an international audience of kids and adults. Fans followed the witty adventures of a quoll named Aji, on his long quest to become a go master.  On the way he encounters a huge variety of go playing animals and creatures, all of whom illustrate different aspects of the game, and provide some kind of lesson to help Aji along the way. “A sequel is possible… I even have a couple of ideas,” said Bezio, “but I have to get back to some other projects before I even think about it seriously.”  The strip can be read on Bezio’s website here, and was also featured on Tigersmouth. -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.  Drawing by Colette Bezio: Aji confronts his worst nightmare, the evil white stones monster.

Categories: World news

This Week’s Go Calendar: Somerville

AGA news - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 14:24

July 13: Somerville, MA
Annual Skip Ascheim Memorial Tournament
Eva W. Casey eva@theworld.com 617-666-8934
Wanda Metcalf wcm@oat.com 978-686-4763

Get the latest go events information.

Categories: World news

Round Four Roundup

IGF Ranka - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 10:39

Suzan D’Bel

After the drama of this morning’s course of events, we expected a less exciting offering this afternoon, but that was not to be the case. China, Korea and Chinese Taipei pushed ahead with their victories against the Ukraine, Hong Kong and Sweden.

Malaysia’s Suzanne D’Bel finally got the chance to employ her trademark tengen strategy, picking black for the first time so far in the tournament. A fight erupted in the first few moves that engulfed the board, eventually leading to the demise of her Portugese opponent Pedro Pereira. See here the game record. Costa Rican system engineer Luis Enrique Boza Araya tried again to mimic D’Bel’s winning strategy but was clinically dispatched by his Swiss adversary Sylvain Gasana Praz.

Matthias Frisch (left) playing Ricardo Quintero Zazueta

Canadian Yongfei Ge snuffed Japan’s Kiko Emura’s ambitions once and for all in an exciting game in which Ge built a gigantic central moyo. Emura went all in with a desperate invasion but it was not enough to shake Canada’s WAGC veteran (game record here).

Elsewhere crazy fighting led to the downfall of Israeli Amir Fragman, and Austrian student Matthias Frisch’s skilful handling of a gigantic semeai dealt him victory against Mexican mathematician Ricardo Quintero Zazueta.

- John Richardson

Categories: World news

Korea & Japan Upset in WAGC; China, Chinese Taipei & Czech Republic Undefeated

AGA news - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 09:46

Korea and Japan, two of the favorites to top the 2014 World Amateur Go Championship, both lost by half a point to their respective opponents from Chinese Taipei and China in the third round of the WAGC on Monday morning. China and Chinese Taipei then solidified their status as clear favorites by handily winning their 4th-round games Monday afternoon, with the Czech Republic’s Lukas Podpera (left) the only other 4-game winner, while Japan’s dwindling hopes were dashed by Canadian Yongfei Ge. Korea, meanwhile, kept their hopes alive with a 4th-round win over Hong Kong. Click here for complete results.

Korean star Taewoong Wei (at right), the clear favorite to win the first WAGC to be held in Korea, felt he had a comfortable lead coming out of the fuseki in the 3rd-round game, but young Yitien Chan (at left in photo) from Chinese Taipei came up with an unexpected play at move 98 that both agreed in their review later (click here for the commented game) gave Chan a winning position, although fierce and complicated play continued for another 200+ moves.

Japan’s Kiko Emura, hoping for victory after a disappointing 8th place in last year’s tournament, also lost a half-pointer to China’s Ruoran Wang; their 3rd-round battle kept fans on the edge of their seats as the two players tussled over an intense endgame in which Emura was constantly under time pressure. As it turned out, the pressure extended to Emura’s clock button, which finally broke, allowing  Emura’s time to expire, and bringing play to a halt as a crowd gathered around the board awaiting the referees’ decision as to how to continue the game. It was decided to keep playing with a new clock, giving the Japanese player one final byo-yomi period. “I was happy with how things were going,” said Emura, “but before I knew it I wound up half a point behind. I’m used to fast time limits but this clock business added to the stress of this important game.”

Other Round 3 Game Records
Norway-Sweden: Includes comments/variations by Thomas Hsiang, Hajin Lee & the players
Lithuania-Denmark: Comments/variations by the players, plus Pal Balogh (Hungary) & Fredrik Blomback (Sweden), in photo at left.
Uncommented game records: Japan-China; Vietnam-Ukraine.

In the 4th round, Malaysia’s Suzanne D’Bel (below, right) finally got the chance to show why the Japanese press call her “Tengen Girl”, drawing black and deploying her trademark tengen strategy. A fight erupted in the first few moves that engulfed the entire board, eventually leading to death and destruction, and the defeat of her Portugese opponent, Pedro Pereira (click here for the game record). Meanwhile, Costa Rican system engineer Luis Enrique Boza Araya once again tried again to mimic D’Bel’s winning strategy but was clinically dispatched by his Swiss adversary Sylvain Gasana Praz.

Canadian Yongfei Ge snuffed Japan’s Kiko Emura’s ambitions once and for all in an exciting 4th-round game in which Ge built – and defended — a gigantic central moyo. Emura went all in with a desperate invasion but it was not enough to shake Canada’s WAGC veteran (click here for the game commentary).

Other Round 4 Game Records (Uncommented)
Korea-Hong-Kong; Russia-Czech-Republic; Ukraine-China

Previous Round Updates: Yesterday’s WAGC report has been updated to include the Japan-Netherlands Round 1 game and we’ve also added the following Round 2 games: Belgium-Czech Republic; Taipei-Hong Kong; Korea-Canada.

- Game reports by John Richardson, game records by Chris Garlock, photos by John Pinkerton and coordination by Ivan Vigano. Click here for Ranka’s complete reports on the third round and fourth round and here for complete results. Matches are broadcast live each round on WBaduk.

Categories: World news

A New Member in the Go Community

IGF Ranka - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 09:01

Chai Hui Lim

“I think it’s great that so many countries are getting together for an international competition!” were the words of Chai Hui Lim, the second President of the Brunei Darussalam Go Association, on her first visit to the World Amateur Go Championship.

“Go is hardly known at all in Brunei. It’s a real challenge to get people interested in Go but like many other countries we are striving hard to popularise the game,” she continued, with a glimmer in her eye. Miss Lim wants to be a schoolteacher in the future.

Categories: World news

Shock Loss and Half-Point Clock Drama

IGF Ranka - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 07:51

Yitien Chan (left) playing Taewoong Wei

Korea and Japan, two of the favourites to top the tournament, both lost by half a point to their respective opponents from Chinese Taipei and China in this morning’s play. To heighten the drama, a broken clock disrupts the Japan-China face-off.

The clocks began to tick at 9.31am this morning, marking the start the crucial second day of the World Amateur Go Championship in Gyeongju, Korea. The pairings included two decisive match-ups whose results will play a large part in deciding the top places in this year’s tournament. Korea versus Chinese Taipei and China versus Japan. Neither game was a disappointment; we were treated to two half-point wins, both gathering large crowds of players, press and officials.

The first result in was a shock to the locals. The young Yitien Chan from Chinese Taipei pushed ahead of Korean star Taewoong Wei to place in great stead for the remainder of the tournament. Wei had been the clear favourite and this could be seen from his dominating posture, but his shoulders began to sink as he realised that victory had slipped between his fingers.

Japan’s Emura, hoping for victory after a disappointing 8th place in last year’s tournament, had his hopes crushed by China’s Ruoran Wang, who snatched a half-point win in this morning’s battle. Both players flailed their fans from side to side as they tussled over an intense endgame where Emura was constantly under time trouble.

The rogue clock

But the drama did not stop there. The Japan-China game turned into Whack-A-Mole as Emura slammed his clock button into submission, eventually rendering it unusable. When finally the clock ceased to respond and Emura’s time ran to zero, a crowd gathered around the board awaiting the referees’ decision as to how to continue the game. It was decided to keep playing with a new clock, giving the Japanese player one final byoyomi period. After the game, chief referee Cho Hunhyun had some stern words with Emura but it is unclear whether it was the clock or the Japanese’s enthusiasm that was to blame.

I was happy with how things were going, but before I knew it I wound up half a point behind. I’m used to fast time limits but this clock business added to the stress of this important game.

This turn of events leaves China and Chinese Taipei as clear favourites for the overall winner. Other countries with three wins are the Ukraine, Russia, Sweden and the Czech Republic.

Full results here. Game records here.

- John Richardson

Categories: World news

Day One in Photos

IGF Ranka - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 00:51

View more photos here.

Categories: World news

Top Seeds Unscathed through Bloodthirsty Second Round

IGF Ranka - Sun, 06/07/2014 - 09:18

After a lunch of fish and assorted kimchi, the players returned to the underground playing area, where they would continue to the second round of this year’s World Amateur Go Championship.

Ohlenbuch (left) playing Leuner

Within fifteen minutes Hungary’s Pal Balogh’s game had yet again finished in a flurry, but this time with victory over Khatanbaatar Tsend-Ayush, a hotel manager from Mongolia. Also quick to finish was the US-India game, both players playing very rapidly until the end. Soon after, South African John William Leuner was defeated by Danish postman Arne Steen Ohlenbuch when his group became entangled in a web of black stones.

This was not the only spectacular game this afternoon. A large crowd gathered around the Indonesia-Luxembourg match-up as semeais erupted and dead stones littered the board. The Malaysian representative Suzanne D’Bel launched a fierce attack on Brazilian representative Csaba Deak and, although he managed to avert this assault, another group came under fire, leading in decisive victory for D’Bel.

D’bel (left) Playing Deak

But the bloodshed didn’t stop there. An audible groan was let out by Francis Roads of the UK as he tried to find a way to save his group from Australian Sangdae Hahn’s onslaught. Not finding a solution, the stone in Roads’ hand was slammed back into the pot, followed shortly by resignation. The candidates from Costa Rica and Portugal joined the list of casualties as large groups were swallowed up by their Belarusian and Lithuanian counterparts.

No suprises again at the top. Korea, China, Japan and Chinese Taipei all won their games. A highlight was Korea-Canada, with Canada’s Yongfei Ge, back again from last year, putting up strong resistance in a relatively peaceful game. His 45-point lower side was not quite enough to overcome Taewoong Wei. Japan vs Singapore took the longest to finish but in the end Kiko Emura’s lead in territory sealed another Japanese victory.

- John Richardson

Categories: World news

Round 1 – Kuin vs Chan

IGF Ranka - Sun, 06/07/2014 - 08:12

Merlijn Kuin (left) and Naisan Chan

Round 1

White: Merlijn  Kuin (Netherlands) 6D
Black: Naisan Chan (Hong Kong) 6D

 

Click here to start the game viewer.

Transcribed by Chris Garlock. Variations and comments by Kuin & Chan.

Categories: World news

35th Annual World Amateur Go Championship Kicks Off; Rounds 1 & 2 Reports

AGA news - Sun, 06/07/2014 - 05:25

Round 1 Reports, Game Record & Photos
There were no surprises for top seeds in the first two rounds of the 35th Annual World Amateur Go Championship in Gyeongju, Korea on Sunday, July 6. In the first-round Japan-Hungary match, the game reached an essentially lost position with only three minutes used on Pal Balogh’s clock. After a twenty minute deliberation, the Hungarian left the playing room but returned minutes later to choose the only possible continuation and struggle through a futile battle to the bitter end. In the Hong Kong-Netherlands game, Naisan Chan (at left in photo) enclosed the Dutch envoy’s central-right stones in another first-round battle but no amount of tsumego wizardry could save Merlijn Kuin’s (right) group from inevitable demise. “I thought W58 was good enough but to be honest I didn’t read it out very carefully,” said Kuin. “I should have taken more time to consider my options.” Click here for the Hong Kong-Netherlands game record.

Other interesting first-round games included Costa Rica versus Belgium, this year seeing a new player, the Costa Rican system engineer Luis Enrique Boza Araya, attempt a tengen-based strategy. He was unable to use the central stone, however, and suffered a crushing defeat at the hands of Belgian accountant Dominique Versyck. Suzanne D’Bel, known by the Japanese press as ‘Tengen Girl’, took white in her game against Andreas Götzfried of Luxembourg, so we have yet to see if she too will employ this unusual opening strategy.

Sweden-US: Jie Liang (US) let his advantage slip away in the middle game as Sweden’s Fredrik Blomback squeaked out a narrow win. Click here for a game commentary by Kim Seung Jun 9P of Blackie’s International Baduk Academy (www.bibabaduk.net), with assistance by Shawn Ray 4D.

Lithuania-Canada (click here for game record): As to be expected in a match-up between a 3-dan and a 7-dan, Canada’s Ge (below at right, reviewing the game) cruised to an early lead; the middle-game death of one of Petrauskas’ (Lithuania) groups simply hastened the inevitable. 

Uncommented Round 1 Game Records:
China-Australia
Denmark-Korea
Thailand-Ukraine

Round 2 Reports, Game Record & Photos
After a lunch of fish and assorted kimchi, the players returned to the underground playing area for the second round. Within fifteen minutes Hungary’s Pal Balogh’s game had yet again finished in a flurry, but this time with victory over Khatanbaatar Tsend-Ayush, a hotel manager from Mongolia. Also quick to finish was the US-India game, both players playing very rapidly until the end. Soon after, South African John William Leuner was defeated by Danish postman Arne Steen Ohlenbuch when his group became entangled in a web of black stones.

This was not the only spectacular game of the afternoon. A large crowd gathered around the Indonesia-Luxembourg match-up as semeais erupted and dead stones littered the board. Malaysian representative Suzanne D’Bel launched a fierce attack on Brazilian Csaba Deak and, although he managed to dodge this assault, another group came under fire, leading to a decisive victory for D’Bel.

But the bloodshed didn’t stop there. An audible groan was let out by the UK’s Francis Roads (at left) as he tried to find a way to save his group from Australian Sangdae Hahn’s deadly onslaught (click here for game record). Not finding a solution, the stone in Roads’ hand was slammed back into the pot, followed shortly by resignation. The candidates from Costa Rica and Portugal joined the list of casualties as large groups were swallowed up by their Belarusian and Lithuanian counterparts.

Round 2 game records
:
Australia-UK
New Zealand-Ireland (photo of Ireland’s John Gibson at right)
Belgium-Czech
Taipei-Hong Kong
Korea-Canada

 

No suprises again at the top, as Korea, China, Japan and Chinese Taipei all won their games. A highlight was Korea-Canada, with Canada’s Yongfei Ge, back again from last year, putting up strong resistance in a relatively peaceful game. His 45-point lower side was not quite enough to overcome Taewoong Wei. Japan vs Singapore took the longest to finish but in the end Kiko Emura’s lead in territory sealed another Japanese victory.
- Game reports by John Richardson, game records by Chris Garlock, photos by John Pinkerton and coordination by Ivan Vigano. Click here for Ranka’s complete reports on the first round and second round and here for complete results.

 

 

Categories: World news

WAGC 2014 Begins!

IGF Ranka - Sun, 06/07/2014 - 04:32

This morning at 9.30am representatives from fifty-four countries and territories placed their bets on odd or even and kicked off the 35th World Amateur Go Championship.

Referees at the 35th WAGC: (from the left) Cho Hun-hyun, Park Seung-chul and Nam Chi-hyung

Unlike last year, where the first round pairings were announced at the Opening Ceremony, this year no preparation was possible for the competitors, who discovered their opponents only minutes before the clocks were started. The pairings for the first round avoid clashes between the top four seeds but otherwise are drawn at random, with players matched within two subclasses to avoid large rating differences.

The first game to finish was Korea-Denmark, with the local favourite Taewoong Wei off to an impressive start. There were no surprises for the other top seeds as China, Japan and Chinese Taipei all scored convincing victories.

Kiko Emura (left) playing Pal Balogh

In particular note was the Japan-Hungary match, the game reaching an essentially lost position with only three minutes used on Pal Balogh’s clock. After a twenty minute deliberation, the Hungarian left the playing room but returned minutes later to chose the only possible continuation and struggle through a futile battle to the bitter end.

The next game to finish saw Hong Kong’s Naisan Chan enclosing the Dutch envoy’s central-right stones. No amount of tsumego wizardry could save Merlijn Kuin’s group from inevitable demise. As the sound of byoyomi counting began to echo across the room, a flurry of games reached their conclusion, with more to follow in dribs and drabs until around midday.

Trophies

Other interesting games included Costa Rica versus Belgium, this year seeing a new player, the Costa Rican system engineer Luis Enrique Boza Araya, attempt a tengen-based strategy. He was unable to use the stone and suffered a crushing defeat to the Belgian accountant Dominique Versyck. Suzanne D’Bel, known by the Japanese press as ‘Tengen Girl’, was White in her game against Andreas Götzfried of Luxembourg, so we are yet to see if she too will employ this unusual opening strategy.

The second round begins at 1.30pm Korean time.

- John Richardson

Categories: World news

6 Players on Why They Love Go and How to Improve

IGF Ranka - Sun, 06/07/2014 - 02:24

Why top players love go is as varied as the players themselves, but they all pretty much agree that in order to get stronger, “you must love the game.” So said Japan’s Emura Kiko at a brief press conference on the opening day of this year’s World Amateur Go Championship, echoed by Malaysia’s Suzanne D’Bel Low, Korea’s Taewoong Wei, China’s Ruoran Wang, Vietnam’s Nhat Minh Vo and the Czech Republic’s Lukas Podpera, who were selected to answer questions at the press conference.

From the left: Emura, D’Bel, Wei, Ruoran, Vo and Podpera

“Go enables me to meet a lot of new friends, who become part of my family,” said Low. “Each game reveals my opponent’s style and personality,” added Podpera. At just 13, Vo is the youngest player at the WAGC, but already the game has enabled him to “meet a lot of interesting new people and travel around the world to share the go spirit,” he said.

And while all the selected players said that lots of play and study is necessary to improve, Podpera was the most specific, noting that “In Europe we are failing at life and death (tsume-go) so that’s what we must study to improve.” Wei was even more succinct, saying that the three things necessary to get better at go are “Will, confidence and concentration.”

- Chris Garlock

Categories: World news

2014 WAGC: 6 Players on Why They Love Go and How to Improve

AGA news - Sat, 05/07/2014 - 22:20

Why top players love go is as varied as the players themselves, but they all pretty much agree that in order to get stronger, “you must love the game.” So said Japan’s Emura Kiko at a brief press conference on the opening day of this year’s World Amateur Go Championship, echoed by Malaysia’s Suzanne D’Bel Low, Korea’s Taewoong Wei, China’s Ruoran Wang, Vietnam’s Nhat Minh Vo and the Czech Republic’s Lukas Podpera, who were selected to answer questions at the press conference. “Go enables me to meet a lot of new friends, who become part of my family,” said Low. “Each game reveals my opponent’s style and personality,” added Podpera. At just 13, Vo is the youngest player at the WAGC, but already the game has enabled him to “meet a lot of interesting new people and travel around the world to share the go spirit,” he said. And while all the selected players said that lots of play and study is necessary to improve, Podpera was the most specific, noting that “In Europe we are failing at life and death (tsume-go) so that’s what we must study to improve.” Wei was even more succinct, saying that the three things necessary to get better at go are “Will, confidence and concentration.”
- Chris Garlock; photo by Ivan Vigano

Categories: World news

Thailand picked for WAGC 2015

IGF Ranka - Sat, 05/07/2014 - 12:20

The International Go Federation Annual General Meeting was held this afternoon at the site of this year’s World Amateur Go Championship, the Hyundai Hotel in Gyeongju, Korea. The lush green grounds of the hotel overlook the beautiful Bomun Lake, a scenic backdrop for the main highlight of the amateur Go calendar.

To begin, some big news: Bangkok has been selected as the location for next year’s World Amateur Go Championship. Thailand’s selection marks the first time this important event will be held outside the Go stronghold of Japan, China and Korea. A promising move towards the internationalisation of the game.

The meeting continued with a roundup of the year’s Go events and report of the IGF finances, all the healthier from the recent slump of the Japanese yen. The main events of last year were the World Amateur Go Championship in Sendai, Japan; the Amateur Pair Go Championship in Tokyo, Japan; and the SportAccord World Mind Games in Beijing, China.

The SAWMG will be held again this year in Beijing (December 11th-17th), and Ranka will provide full coverage of the event. The format will be similar to previous years, combining Go, Chess, Bridge, Draughts and Xiangqi events. Poker applied again this year to join, but was denied for the second time. This year’s WAGC will see the continuation of anti-doping tests in order to keep the game of Go in line with sporting regulations, a step on the path towards Olympic recognition, a common goal for the mind games at the SAWMG.

Another exciting piece of news is the birth of the Student Pair Go Championship, which is to take place for the first time this October in Tokyo. This new event will be held together with the standard Pair Go Championship, which itself will be particularly special marking the 25th anniversary of Pair Go. The student championship is planned to be run as a separate event from next year.

IGF President: Seokhyun Hong

We conclude with an announcement of changes to the IGF Board of Executives. This year will see a rotation of roles from Japan to Korea. The new IGF President will be Seokhyun Hong, previously the Korean Ambassador to the US, taking the reins from Koichiro Matsuura. “I will try my best but my work alone is not enough. We need everyone’s input and initiative to bring our plans to a successful creation.” Jae-ho Yang, the Secretary General of the Korean Baduk Association, takes up the role of Office Director, resuming the hard work of Hiroshi Yamashiro. Yuki Shigeno, the long serving Secretary General, gave a tearful farewell, passing the post on to Hajin Lee, the main organiser of this year’s WAGC. Norio Wada, the chairman of the Nihon Kiin, will also join the Board of Directors.

- John Richardson

Categories: World news

Friendship Match Launches 2014 World Amateur Championship in Korea

AGA news - Sat, 05/07/2014 - 06:14

The 35th World Amateur Go Championship got underway Saturday morning in Gyeongju, Korea with the traditional Friendship Match between local go players and the WAGC players from around the world. Gathered in the main playing area on the first floor of the Hotel Hyundai, the WAGC players’ places were marked as usual by their nation’s flags and the locals eagerly joined them for a spirited round of friendly but intense matches. At the head of the room were pro Kim In 9P (at right in photo at lower left) playing a teaching game with a local luminary beneath the WAGC banner. Gyeongju City, along with the Republic of Korea, is hosting the WAGC in this scenic resort in the Bomun Lake resort area. In the back of the room, professional Hyun Wook Lee (at right in bottom right photo) played a 10-on-1 simul while Ms. Yun Jin Bae gave some three dozen avid youngsters a go lecture. After an opening ceremony and banquet on Saturday night, the tournament will begin Sunday and run through Wednesday, with games scheduled each morning and afternoon. The E-Journal and Ranka are teaming up again this year to provide full coverage of the WAGC, including updates on each round, player interviews, game commentaries, photos and final daily results at the end of each day.
- report/photos by Chris Garlock

Categories: World news

Go Congress Hotel Rates, Late Fees Going Up July 15

AGA news - Sat, 05/07/2014 - 05:21

July 15 is the deadline to reserve the lowest hotel prices for US Go Congress attendees at the Hotel Pennsylvania. “After July 15, we cannot guarantee room availability or prices, so you’d have to book rooms at the hotel’s normal rates instead of our special discounted rates,” says Congress Director Matthew Hershberger. “We’ve negotiated incredibly low rates with the Hotel Pennsylvania for go players, so don’t miss out!” Late fees for Congress registration will also go up after July 15. The US Go Congress runs August 9-17 in New York City.

Categories: World news

Zhang Wins Happy Cup Youth Tourney

AGA news - Fri, 04/07/2014 - 01:00
The annual Sunflower Happy Cup Youth Go Tournament, in Cupertino, drew 44 kids this year, reports organizer Wenguang Wang.  8th grader Wilson Zhang was the winner in group A with 4 wins.  ”It was a super hot afternoon, which made the ice cream party at the end of the tournament very refreshing,” Wang told the Journal. The event was held June 8th, at the Sunflower Chinese School. More photos can be seen here.  -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor.  Photo by Wenguang Wang.
Categories: World news

Volunteers Wanted to Help Teach Go at DC Folk Life Festival

AGA news - Wed, 02/07/2014 - 20:40

Local organizers are looking for volunteers to help teach go at the final weekend of the Smithsonian’s Folk Life Festival on the National Mall in Washington, DC this Saturday and Sunday. Local players Julian Erville (left) and Juan Pablo Quizon were joined by fellow DC-area club members Todd Heidenreich, Ed Hsu, Sam Lee, Mike Pak, Yi Weng, Justin Teng, and John Goon last weekend “as they taught weiqi/go to some promising young talent,” says Goon, who coordinated the effort reaching more than 200 each day. China and Kenya are the centerpieces of the festival, which ends on Sunday. Contact John Goon at Spineyone@yahoo.com for details on how to volunteer.
-photo by John Goon

Categories: World news

AGA Board Election Ballots Sent Out; Due Back August 8

AGA news - Wed, 02/07/2014 - 20:28

Ballots for the 2014 American Go Association Board elections have been sent to chapters and members, reports Arnold Eudell. “If you have not received your ballot and believe you should have, first check your spam folder,” Eudell says. “Then send a note to elections@usgo.org.” Note that only one ballot can be sent per email. If an email is duplicated, such as for a child’s membership, only one voting code will be sent. Contact the email address above with a unique email to receive all ballots. Also, comments sent through Ballot Bin are anonymous; if you want a response send comments to elections@usgo.org. Voting closes August 8.

 

Categories: World news

Your Move/Readers Write: Impressive Ge; Looking for Spanish Go News

AGA news - Wed, 02/07/2014 - 17:00

Impressive Ge:  “7 Dan is impressive,” writes Chris Uzal about our profile of Canada’s Yongfei Ge (2014 WAGC Player Profiles: Americas & Oceania 6/29 EJ). “Playing go in the womb is even more impressive: ‘Yongfei Ge 7D is a 30-year-old software architect from Scarborough. He’s been playing for 30 years…’”
That would be impressive indeed! In fact, Ge is 45 and has been playing since he was 15.

Looking for Spanish Go News: Uzal also asks “Where can I find go news in Spanish? I work for a local Spanish newspaper. I have enough influence to get go stories published. I’d like to see more on the Latin American players.”
Send your tips on where to find go news in Spanish to us at journal@usgo.org and we’ll pass it along.

Categories: World news
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