World news

2014 US Open Ratings Released

AGA news - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 00:54

The 2014 US Open has now been rated. Click here for the AGA ratings page where you can search by name or AGA membership number. You can also see the final wall list here.

Categories: World news

Cotsen Open Pre-Registration Closes Thursday at Midnight

AGA news - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 00:49

Pre-registration for the Cotsen Open will be closing at midnight on Thursday night.  After that, players will have to register at the door on Saturday morning. The 2-day tournament will be held on October 25-26 at the Korean Cultural Center in Los Angeles. “We will also be printing hats with the Cyclops Killer logo on them,” reports organizer Samantha Davis. “They will be for sale at the tournament.” Organizers are still looking for more volunteers for setup on Friday from 11am-5pm.  “All volunteers will get a free hat and a pizza lunch,” says Davis. Email her at cotsenopen@gmail.com. Sponsored by Eric Cotsen, the tournament is one of the biggest on the annual U.S. go calendar and features thousands of dollars in prizes, an Open Division, live KGS commentary on top board games, free masseuses for players, and free food truck lunches to all those who pre-register for both days of the tournament. There will also be a demonstration game between Yilun Yang 7P and Yigang Hua 8P. As usual, everyone who pre-registers and plays in all five of their matches will have their full entry fee refunded; click here to register. Follow the Cotsen on Twitter and Facebook for the latest tournament news.

Categories: World news

AGA Rules at Portland Tournament

AGA news - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 00:43

Two unusual occurrences highlighted details of the AGA rules at the Portland Go Tournament last weekend.

One game involved a seki with points: two black groups, each with one eye, separated by a white group with none. The white group shared one liberty with each black group, which neither player wanted to fill. The Japanese rules give no points in seki, but the AGA rules make no such special exception; black’s eyes are territory. These two points did not affect the outcome of that game.

A second game was resolved by mathematical proof. At the end of the game, the score was a tie on the board, so white won by the half-point komi. (This was a “one stone handicap” game). Later, black discovered a stone on the floor that he claimed was a prisoner of his. Could it be determined if that stone came from this game? Another player argued that the tie on the board was impossible, given that there was no seki and both players played the same number of moves. Working with several players, the tournament director constructed a proof of this fact. If both players played the same number of moves, the total number of stones on the board (after filling prisoners into territory) must be an even number. Since there are 361 points on the board, the total amount of territory (i.e., the number of vacant points) must be odd. Both players therefore cannot have the same score, so a stone did disappear from this game. White bowed to this logic and the result was reversed.

The tournament was held October 18-19 on the picturesque campus of Lewis & Clark College in Portland, Oregon. 32 players participated.

The winners, from first to third in each division, were:

Open division: Kaichi Suzuki (5-0), Boyang Chen (founding the University of Oregon Go Club), Xudong Zhao
Dan division: Ben Hakala, Maxwell Chen, Troy Wahl
Single-digit kyu division: Daniel Takamori, Sam Levenick (president of the Lewis & Clark Go Club), Robert O’Malley
Double-digit kyu division: Ethan Zhuang (5-0), Roger LaMarche, Vivienne Blandy
Top youth player: Ethan Zhuang
Top female player: Vivienne Blandy

The tournament director wishes to thank Yellow Mountain Imports for a discount on prizes, GoClubs.org for their outstanding tournament software, the Lewis & Clark College Go Club for access to the rooms, and the various volunteers who brought boards, snacks, etc.
- Peter Drake, TD

photo: Daniel Takamori (left) and Thor Dodson enjoy a bonus game in the 75-degree October sun while waiting for the end of the last round.

 

Categories: World news

4 US Players Participate in 16th Ibero-American Championship in Quito, Ecuador

AGA news - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 00:35

The 16th Ibero-American Championship was held in Quito, Ecuador, from October 10 to 12. Forty-seven players from 11 countries participated: Argentina (4), Brazil (5), Columbia (2), Ecuador (23), Guatemala (1), Mexico (1), Korea (1), Peru (2), the United Kingdom (1), USA (4), and Venezuela (3). Players ranged in strength from 6d to 10k. Fernando Aguilar (6d) of Argentina won the championship with a 7-0 score. Click here for complete results.

“I had a great time,” said Bob Gilman, one of the US players. The other US players were John Harriman 2D, Devin Fraze 3k and Tania Kadakia 5k. “The games were good ones; the players friendly; and the event well organized. Quito is a lively and interesting city. I was able to get along well despite my poor Spanish.”

Categories: World news

Barberi, Vick & Crawford Top Cocoa Go Tourney

AGA news - Wed, 22/10/2014 - 00:27

Eighteen players entered the September 18 Cocoa Go Tournament in Cocoa, Florida, with ranks from 4-dan to 25-kyu and ages that spanned more than 60 years.  The two youngest players are shown below (top left) facing off in Round 2.  Eddie Crawford 25k is on the left and Yuliang Huang 15k is on the right.  Lu Mueller-Kaul 16k and Lewis Hyman 14k are

at the back of the table.  The event was a one-day Swiss with three rounds and three categories, hosted by the Space Coast Area Go Association.  First place winners were Steve Barberi 1k, Tony Vick 6k, and Heather Crawford 14k.  Prizes were donated by Slate and Shell and Yellow Mountain Imports and were awarded to the first three places in each category.  Cocoa is located in Brevard County on the east central coast of Florida, near the Kennedy Space Center.  The Central Brevard Library provided a free meeting room for the event.  A pizza party followed the event at the home of Bart and Judy Lipofsky.
- report by Bart Lipofsky

WINNERS
Category 1 (above 5K)
1 Steve Barberi 1K AGA 2323
2 Johnathan Fisher 3D AGA 21138
3 Joseph Carl 2K AGA 7767

Category 2 (above 11K)
1 Tony Vick  6K AGA 19856
2 Paul Wiegand 7K 8204
3 Anthony Yon 6K 15880

Category 3 (above 30K)
1 Heather Crawford 14K AGA 18750
2 Yuliang Huang 15K (tie) AGA 20387
2 Lu MuellerKaul 16K (tie) AGA 20961
3 Eddie Crawford 25K 21449

Categories: World news

This Week’s Go Calendar: Arlington, Austin, Lawrenceville, Los Angeles

AGA news - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 20:07

October 25: Arlington, VA
NOVA Pumpkin Classic
Gary Smith gary@novagoclub.org 703-254-6429

October 25: Austin, TX
Austin 2014 Fall Classic
Bart Jacob bart.jacob@gmail.com 512-659-1324

October 25: Lawrenceville, NJ
One-Day Go Tournament
Ronghao Chen chenronghao@yahoo.com 908-872-6202

October 25-26: Los Angeles, CA
2014 Cotsen Open with 3rd AGA Pro Prelim
Samantha Davis cotsenopen@gmail.com

Get the latest go events information.

Categories: World news

Interview with Choi Gyubyung

IGF - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 06:34

The Choongam Baduk Dojang (go academy) has been a driving force behind Korean Baduk for the past two decades. In the 1990s it was not only a training place for young aspirants but also a meeting place where some of the strongest Korean players would get together to analyze games and investigate new moves. In 2011 it was reorganized in its present form by the merger of three dojangs. When the players at the 2014 Korea Prime Minister Cup visited it on September 18, they were welcomed by its headmaster Choi Gyubyung, 9-dan. He explained that Choongam was currently the leading baduk academy in Korea, having the largest number of insei and having turned out the largest number of professional players. Photos of these pros adorned the hallways. The 51 KPMC contestants were then matched against a like number of Choongam students for a friendship match. While the match was in progress, Mr Choi kindly consented to an intervew with Ranka.

Ranka: Please tell us a little about the history and organization of Choongam.
Choi: Choongam has a long history, and I've been with it since the beginning. It was founded in its present form in 2011 by Yang Jaeho, Yoo Changhyuk, and Heo Janghoe, all professional 9-dan. It has students of many levels, up to the insei level. There are different rooms for students of different levels. As a pupil advances from level to level, he or she moves up from room to room.

Ranka: How many foreign students do you have?
Choi: At present Benjamin Lockhart, from America, is studying here, and we have students from Taiwan as well. In the recent past we've also had European students, from Czechia, France, and Poland, for example.

Ranka: How was today's friendship match organized?
Choi: We matched the KPMC contestants against the Choongam students in order of rank, for the contestants, and rating, for the Choongam students. We excluded the top twenty Choongam students, so we started with number twenty-one, who was matched against the top ranked KPMC contestant, and then so on down.

Ranka: What do you think are the keys to becoming a good baduk player?
Choi: To start with, memory is important, as it is in any form of education, not just baduk. You have to gain and retain knowledge. But the most important thing in baduk is to develop the ability to figure things out for yourself. To do some original thinking during your games.

Ranka: How do you view the current baduk competition between China and Korea?
Choi: Last year China pulled ahead of Korea, but I think this may be a temporary situation. China has a very good educational system, however. It will be very interesting to see how the contest between China and Korea develops in the future.

Ranka: Thank you very much.

Postscript: Ranka was unable to keep tally of how all the friendship matches turned out, but at the top end, the KPMC contestants had a tough time. Although the KPMC champion-to-be Wei Taewoong won his game, China's Hu Yuqing, twice world amateur champion, lost to Choongam's Cho Namkyun, and Japan's Tsuchimune Yoshiyuki lost to Choongam's Moon Hyojin. At the bottom end, however, where the Choongam side consisted mostly of primary school students who were still near the beginning of their serious baduk studies, it was a different story. Ranka is pleased to report that some of the smallest European countries can still produce players who can defeat some of the kids at Korea's leading baduk academy.

 

Categories: World news

Lantz Keynote Speech Posted Online

AGA news - Sat, 18/10/2014 - 02:34

New York University Game Center Director Frank Lantz’ keynote speech at this year’s US Go Congress (Game Theorist Frank Lantz on why go should be “A little less Tang Dynasty and a little more NASCAR” 8/13 EJ) is now available online. Click here for a video of the talk, here for a Powerpoint version and here for a PDF. Lantz says he’s interested in “continu(ing) to be involved in helping grow and promote go worldwide.”

Categories: World news

San Diego Collects on AGA’s Free Pizza Offer

AGA news - Sat, 18/10/2014 - 02:18

The San Diego Go Club became the first AGA chapter to take advantage of the free pizza offer (AGA Chapter Offer: Play Go, Get Free Pizza! 10/3 EJ) when it held a go party on October 12 at the home of the chapter’s president. Twenty people turned out for the noon-5 p.m. event and seven new members were signed up for the AGA. While many self-paired games were played, only three AGA rated games were played. “At 5 p.m., everyone enjoyed pizza,” reports club president Ted Terpstra. Chapters that meet in October, play at least one rated game, order pizza and send in a photo of the festivities — and the receipt– will have the cost of the pizza reimbursed. This offer only valid for AGA chapters; if your club is not a chapter, click here to sign up as a chapter today. Send your receipts to operations@usgo.org.

 

Categories: World news

Promoting Go at Chinese Cultural Festival in Chicago

AGA news - Tue, 14/10/2014 - 22:05

“Thousands of students, parents, and residents from the Chicago area visited a 4-hour Chinese Cultural Festival on Sept. 27th,” reports organizer Xinming Simon Guo. “This fun and educational event is held to promote Chinese culture and art, and also to celebrate the 10th anniversary of Confucius Institute Day. It is organized by the Confucius Institute in Chicago, Chicago Public Schools, and the Confucius Institute at Valparaiso University. Weiqi/go is one of the most popular booths among 20 different Chinese cultural and art activity booths. As one of the organizers, I couldn’t stay at the booth to promote weiqi as usual. So I turned to the AGA for help. An E-J announcement soliciting help drew two volunteers from the Chicago weiqi community, Nathan and Nicole. They were put in charge of an activity called “Weiqi in 5 minutes” to introduce fundamental rules to passersby. Participants who could solve 80% of the go problems got gift tickets which could be redeemed during the event,” said Guo. CCTV (China Central Television),  the largest network in China, broadcast the cultural festival on its international channel. A one-minute video clip featuring the weiqi booth, is here.  “It is said that CCTV plans to promote more weiqi on their channels,” says Guo. “I believe the major reason is that Xi Jinping, the President of China, knows how to play weiqi, which was confirmed by Nie Weiping 9P.” - Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor, Photo by Xinming Simon Guo: Nathan and Nicole teach kids how to play go.

 

Categories: World news

Interview with Alexandra Urbán

IGF - Tue, 14/10/2014 - 03:06

This is a continuation of an interview Ranka had with Alexandra when she played in the first World Mind Sports Games in Beijing six year ago. At that time she had interrupted her university studies in Hungary to study go at the International Baduk Academy in Korea. That interview ended with Ranka asking Alexandra what her future plans were. She said she wanted to get stronger at go, see how much progress she had made a year later, and then decide what to do next. What she eventually decided to do was to enroll as a graduate student in Korean literature at a Korean university. Studying Korean literary theory and writing a thesis in Korean left her little time to play go, so when she earned her degree and returned to Hungary, she was playing only at about the 1-dan level. Nevertheless, when a call went out on the Internet for someone to represent Hungary at the 2014 Korea Prime Minister Cup, she answered it.

Ranka: How did you get started playing go?
Alexandra: Actually I got started by accident when I was fifteen. I was looking around on Internet sites, I think Japanese-related sites, and I found this site about go and I got really interested in it. So I started to play on KGS and later looked for some Hungarian players, and that is how I started the game.

Ranka: And how did you come to pursue a graduate degree in Korean literature?
Alexandra: That actually developed from my interest in Korea. After I spent one and a half years in Korea I went back to Hungary and graduated from my university, and after that I went to one of these reading evenings. It was something like a reading circle. They were reading Korean writers' short stories, and I really liked them. I really liked their atmosphere. They were very, like, harmonious. And so when I later applied for a scholarship to Korea, a governmental scholarship, I thought, I could study Korean literature in Korean, which is an asset, and I'm also kind of interested in Korean literature, so why not?

Ranka: Can you tell us about one Korean author that you particularly like?
Alexandra: Of course! To start with, I like female writers a lot, because in Hungary thare are not that many of them; it's still mainly male writers that dominate the scene. One of the writers I like is Kong Ji-young. She's quite famous and has a lot of works in translation. I particularly like her because I wrote my thesis about her. She's one of the first female writers that got really famous. She writes about things in a very female way that I like very much.

Ranka: What does she write about?
Alexandra: Well, she writes about several things, but the short stories I particularly like from her are about making the transfer from the eighties, when Korea was still sort of a dictatorship, to the nineties when they finally became democratized. It became an inner struggle inside Korean people, especially Korean youth, university students. At one time in the eighties they thought that socialism was going to be the way to go, but at the end of the eighties a lot of Eastern European socialist states became democratic. So they had this whole world collapsing inside them. How were they to overcome the collapse?

Ranka: You now work as a translator. Have you translated any go books from Korean into Hungarian?
Alexandra: No, because the go population of Hungary is only about 100 to 150.

Ranka: What do you translate?
Alexandra: Well, right now I'm just starting out, so I'm trying to establish myself as a freelancer. So far I've mostly translated literature, and that's what I'm most interested in. Much of my work has been proofreading translations by Koreans who are translating Hungarian literature into Korean: famous Hungarian writers or famous Hungarian historical books. I've also worked as an interpreter; I interpreted for a well-known writer when he was in Hungary. His name is Yi Mun-yeol and he's very famous in Korea, so I was really happy to have that chance.

Ranka: We wish you good luck in your career.
Alexandra: Thank you.

Postscript: Alexandra scored two wins during the KPMC, over opponents from Austria and Slovakia.

 - Photo: Ito Toshiko

 

Categories: World news

AGA Twitter Account Nears 1,000-Follower Mark

AGA news - Mon, 13/10/2014 - 21:11

The American Go Association’s Twitter account is about to cross the 1,000-follower mark. Those following @theaga are the first to get the AGA’s go news, like Monday’s posting that the 2014 US Open ratings had been released or the Cotsen Open’s request for “Volunteers Needed to help with setup on Friday,October 24, 11am -5pm. Pizza lunch provided.Please contact Samantha at CotsenOpen@gmail.com” Please follow us now @theaga and retweet widely.

Categories: World news

Interview with Andre Connell

IGF - Mon, 13/10/2014 - 21:09

Andre Connell is a Johannesburg-based information technology consultant who represented South Africa at the 2014 Korea Prime Minister Cup in Seoul. Ranka spoke with him after he had played two rounds and split two games with very different Asian opponents.

Ranka: How did you learn about the game of go?
Andre: I learned about the game at Stellenbosch University, which is where I studied. We have a student center where the students can go and get fairly cheap food, and the go club used to meet there. So one evening I walked past and asked the guys, 'What are those? Can you eat them?' Which is kind of the standard question. It started from there and I've been playing ever since.

Ranka: How many years ago was that?
Andre: That was in '95, so it was nineteen years ago.

Ranka: How has go developed in South Africa during those nineteen years?
Andre: It's grown. During the Hikaru no Go phase when everyone was watching the manga, it grew quite a lot. We've kept a few of those players, and I think the general level in South Africa has improved quite a bit. We have one very strong player, Victor Chow, who has been playing in South Africa and is pretty much the strongest guy around in our country, but there are a lot of the rest of us who have also increased our level. I'd say we've got between five and ten players at around the two to four dan level now, which is much better than, let's say, fifteen or twenty years ago when I started, when we had only a couple of dan players. So that's basically where we are at the moment. We're not as strong as many of the European countries, for example, but we're doing fairly well.

Ranka: Does Victor Chow teach the rest of you?
Andre: Yes. We generally play against him in tournaments. Every time you get to a tournament, which can be about two to five times a year, you get to play a game against him, and it's pretty much a teaching game.

Ranka: Do you also go into the places where the original African population lives?
Andre: The townships, for example. One of our strongest clubs is actually in Soweto. We have a couple of players from there who have actually gone to the World Amateur Championships and to the KPMC. I think about seven or eight years ago Julius Paulu went to the World Amateur Champs, and Welile Gogotshe went to the KPMC four years ago. Julius was around 1-dan. He's unfortunately passed away since then, but Welile is one of the strongest players in South Africa. He's probably around 3-dan. He's doing very well.

Ranka: And now, can you tell us about your first game, this morning?
Andre: My first game this morning was against Mongolia. It was quite a tight game. I had a large lead up to about move 100, and then I kept losing little chunks of territory and stones, and eventually managed to sneak it by 2-1/2 points, but it was quite tight at the end. It was one of those that almost got away. At least it was 'almost' -- it didn't get properly away.

Ranka: And what was the story this afternoon?
Andre: I played against the Korean player. He is very strong, quite a few stones stronger than I am, but it was a lot of fun. I tried to attack one of his groups. It didn't work out too well, and then he had one of my groups on the run. It managed to live, but he ended up taking a quarter of the board in return, so he was twenty or thirty points ahead and there was no way I could catch up, unfortunately.

Ranka: Thank you and good luck in the upcoming rounds.

Postscript: In the remaining rounds Andre faced four European opponents and beat one of them to finish 36th.

- Photo: Ito Toshiko

 

Categories: World news

This Week’s Go Calendar: Cocoa, Minneapolis, Portland, Somerville

AGA news - Mon, 13/10/2014 - 13:11

October 18: Cocoa, FL
Cocoa Go Tournament
Bart Lipofsky blipo@yahoo.com
George Lebovitz rokkitsci@att.net

October 18: Minneapolis, MN
TCGO Fall 2014 Rated Games Day
Aaron Broege 612-384-8789

October 18-19: Portland, OR
Portland Go Tournament
Peter Drake drake@lclark.edu 503-768-7539

October 19: Somerville, MA
Massachusettw Go Association Fall Tournament
Eva Casey eva@theworld.com 617-666-8934
Wanda Metcalf wcm@oat.com 978-686-4763

Get the latest go events information.

Categories: World news

Upcoming European Tournaments: Bratislava Solstice, London Open

AGA news - Mon, 13/10/2014 - 13:00

Go Club Tango and the Slovak go association will host the 2014 Winter Solstice Bratislava on December 27 and 28 at Hotel Viktor. The 13 EU fee must be paid-on site but organizer Julius Masarovic requests that all players register online before December 10. Players who wish to stay at Hotel Viktor for the duration of the tournament will enjoy a discount. Cash and material prizes will be available for top players. To register or for more information, please visit the Klub Taogo website.

The British Go Association and Central London Go Club will host the 41st London Open Go Congress 2014 from December 28 to December 31 at the International Students House. Cash prizes will be available for the top 4 players, the top 2 players “below the bar,” and the top player who started the tournament with a GoR of 10 kyu or below. In addition to the main tournament, there will be lectures, pair go, and lightning games as well as a rengo tournament and New Year’s Eve meal for those who wish to stay for celebrations. Students and junior players (under age 18) will receive discounts. Players who wish to play only for one or two days will also receive lower rates but all players must register before December 15. To register or for more information, please visit the official London Open website.

—Annalia Linnan; for complete listings, check out the European Tournament Calendar

Categories: World news

Your Move/Readers Write: DC-Area Korean Clubs

AGA news - Mon, 13/10/2014 - 12:00

“This is a call to all the metro DC area go players,” writes Nick Jhirad. “There are two excellent Kiwons in the Annandale area which I’ve been attending recently:

The Korean-American Baduk Association of Washington ($15 per day)
7535 Little River Turnpike G 100-A Annandale VA (entrance inside the parking garage)
This one has a monitor broadcasting BadukTV, study material, complimentary drinks, and nonsmoking indoors.

The Washington Hankuk Baduk Club ($10 per day)
4110 Horseshoe Dr Annandale VA (There are two entrances to Horseshoe drive, it’s on a loop, if you’re having difficulty finding it, just keep driving around, it has a sign out in front in Korean and a number of cars in the driveway and around)
This one is a house that is also used as the club, they have a nonsmoking section on the first floor and a deck and basement where smoking does take place.

Both have a good number of players every day and are available from the morning to late at night. In the interests of their profitability and continued existence it would be great if AGA players would make use of them. The average level of the players is a bit stronger than what you might find at clubs that meet once a week, but there are people at all strengths.

Their existence and their openness to outsiders is truly unique, let’s do what we can to make them successful!”
photo: playing on the deck of the Washington Hankuk Baduk Club; photo by Nick Jhirad

Categories: World news

Interview with Lorenz Trippel

IGF - Sun, 12/10/2014 - 22:47

Lorenz Trippel is a Swiss 1-dan who works at an office in Zurich, likes cycling, is an active go organiser  and is also a prolific provider of go information on the Internet. Ranka talked with him shortly after he arrived in Seoul for the 2014 Korea Prime Minister Cup.

Ranka: Please tell us about go in Switzerland.
Lorenz: We have a long history of go in Switzerland. We started in the late 1970s or early 1980s, and from there we have been growing slowly, like everywhere else in Europe, I think. Now we have about 150, maybe 200 active go players. We have the tradition that every club holds a tournament each year, so we have eight or nine tournaments a year. As we are small, our organization has waves. Sometimes the people get very active and do a lot, and some other times things go a bit slow. But still, we are maintaining quite a good tournament schedule. We also try to promote the game on some special occasions where we can put up a stand, talk to the public, and explain the rules. That's probaby, from my point of view, the most important thing the organization can do: to promote the game.

Ranka: How did you get started in go?
Lorenz: I got started through my family. My father played, my aunt played, and I have an older brother who played -- a half-brother, who is much older than me. When I was like ten he was already in his thirties. So they would play against each other, my father and my brother, and I would watch them playing. That's how I started, just by observing the older family members. And then one day I started to play myself, but I don't really remember the moment when I started to play.

Ranka: Please tell us more about your go-playing aunt.
Lorenz: She's now over one hundred years old, and she has a very emotional connection to the game. She's not a strong player. She just has this feeling about it, about playing the stones. She likes the game, but she is not competitive at all. To her, it's more of a social doing.

Ranka: And what are you looking forward to in the KPMC?
Lorenz: In this tournament I really couldn't say what I'm looking forward to. I just want to play good games. I cannot win a prize. I'm sure that if I play too well in the beginning I will meet some very strong opponents and get crushed, so how well I do cannot be counted by numbers. I just want to to play good games.

Ranka: Thank you and we hope you do.

Postscript: Lorenz played quite well on the first day of the KPMC, beating 2-dan and 3-dan opponents from Norway and Spain and losing only to a 4-dan from the Netherlands. His prediction then came true: on the second day he was matched against a pair of 5-dans from Thailand and Germany and a 4-dan from Israel, lost all three games, and finished 35th. But that was still second highest among the eight 1-dans competing.

- Photo: Ito Toshiko

 

Categories: World news

UCC Go Tournament

Irish Go Association - Sun, 12/10/2014 - 19:19

We are pleased to learn that the next Go tournament in Cork is coming up soon. You can find full details on the UCC website, but as a summary we can tell you this.

The tournament will be a 5 round Swiss, and will take place on the 15th and 16th of November at the Mardyke Pavillion in University College Cork. The prize fund is at least 300 euro, but more importantly there will be free tea, coffee, biscuits, and cake available.

Categories: World news

Australian Tournaments Coming Up

AGA news - Sun, 12/10/2014 - 17:52

It’s Spring in Australia and tournaments are popping up all over. The Australian tournaments all attract selection points towards qualification for the Australian teams at the various world championships. Here’s a quick rundown:

• 1st Sydney Spring Tournament, Sunday 19th October, Surry Hills, New South Wales (see sydney.baduk.org.au)
• 4th Gold Coast Classic, Sunday 26th October, Helensvale, Queensland (rsvp to horatio@go.org.au)
• 2014 Wellington Open, Saturday 29th and Sunday 30th November, Victoria University, Wellington, New Zealand.
• 37th Australian Championships, Saturday 6th and Sunday 7th December, Sydney City Go Club, Surry Hills (Sydney), New South Wales
• 35th Queensland Championships, Saturday 28th February to Sunday 1st March, University of Queensland (Brisbane), Queensland
Click here for all current Australian go tournament info.

Categories: World news

EuroGoTV Update: Ukraine, Russia, France

AGA news - Sun, 12/10/2014 - 16:22

Ukraine: The Ukrainian Championship finished on October 5 in Kyiv with Valerii Krushelnytskyi 3d in first, Dmytro Yatsenko 5d in second, and Vasyl Skochko 4d in third. Russia: Also on October 5, Georgij Pimenov 16k bested Dmitrij Arkhipov 11k at the Korean Council Cup in Sankt-Peterburg while Dmitrij Shpigel 15k placed third. France: Viktor Lin 6d (left) took the European Student Go Championship in Toulouse on September 28. Behind him were Mihai Valentin Serban 5d in second and Johannes Obenaus 5d in third.

– Annalia Linnan, based on reports from EuroGoTV, which include complete result tables and all the latest European go news; photo courtesy of EuroGoTV

Categories: World news
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