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Cape Town Open 2016

South Africa* - Wed, 11/05/2016 - 16:50
The Cape Town Open will take place on Saturday 14th May at A Touch Of Madness restaurant, in Observatory, Cape Town. Registration begins 9 am Currently registered: Andrew Davies, 3d Sam Scott, 3d Chris Welsh, 2d Lloyd Rubidge, 1d Paul Steyn, 2k Francois van Niekerk, 3k Gordon Wells, 7k Michael Rapson, 9k Rory Shea, 11k […]

Preliminary line-up of Go Congress pros (and topics) announced

AGA news - Mon, 09/05/2016 - 22:45

Organizer’s of this year’s US Go Congress – July 30- August 7 in Boston, MA — have just announced the following line-up of professionals and their lecture topics.  Myungwan Kim 9p: “Mathematical Endgame” (all levels), “Liberty racing” (kyu level), “Puppydog and Bulldozer” (all level) and many more. Yilun Yang 7p on “How to play a reasonable opening” and “Against a strange move.” Andy Liu 1p on “The secret to get stronger.” Stephanie Yin 1p will present a series: “How to improve from one level to another” (15 kyu to 5 kyu) and “How to improve from one level to another” (5 kyu to 1 dan). More pro news and lecture topics are coming in the future, Congress organizers promise. Meanwhile, nearly 300 have already registered for this year’s Congress; click here for complete details.

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The Power Report: China’s Li wins 3rd Globis Cup

AGA news - Mon, 09/05/2016 - 22:35

by John Power, Japan correspondent for the E-Journal. As in 2015, I was invited to cover the Globis Cup for the E-Journal;  I hope readers will forgive the delay in submitting my report.

China’s Li wins 3rd Globis Cup:  The third Globis Cup, an international tournament for young players sponsored by the Globis Corporation, was held from April 22 to 24. Li Qincheng 1P (left) of China won.  The full name of the tournament is the Globis Cup World Go U-20, and it is open to players under 20 as of January 1 of this year. Participating were six players from Japan, three from China, three from Korea, and one each from Chinese Taipei, Europe, North America, and the Asia/Oceania zone. The venue was the Graduate School of Management, Globis University, a business school run by the corporation; it is located in the Kojimachi area, a short walk from the Nihon Ki-in. The tournament is the brainchild of Hori Yoshito (right), who is the president of Globis University and also a director of the Nihon Ki-in.

At present, this is the only international tournament held every year in Japan and the only one for players under 20. The aim of the tournament is to raise the level of teenaged players in Japan who may not have many opportunities to take part in international tournaments. Of course, all the participants benefit, but the founder Mr. Hori is particularly concerned to raise the level of Japanese go and has set the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Nihon Ki-in (2024) as the target date for achieving this ambition. 

The new tournament started well for Japan, with two Japanese representatives making the final (the first time this had happened for 16 years) in the 1st Cup (Ichiriki Ryo beat Kyo Kagen). In the 2nd edition, on which I reported last year for
 the EJ, Huang Yunsong 4P of China beat Na Hyeon 6P of Korea in the final.

Below is a full list of this year’s competitors with their ages.
Japan: Ichiriki Ryo 7P (18), Son Makoto 4P (20, as of February 21), Kyo Kagen 3P (18), Matsuura Yuta 2P (16), Shibano Toramaru 2P (16), Onishi Ryuhei 1P (16)
China: Fan Yunruo 4P (20, as of Jan. 7), Yang Dingxin 3P (17), Li Qincheng 1P (17)
Korea: Lee Donghun 5P (18), Shin Jinseo 5P (16), Byeon Sangil 4P (19)
Chinese Taipei: Lin Shih-Hsun 5p (18)
Europe: Grigorii Fionin 7D (17)
North America: Justin Ching 7D (14)
Thailand: Krit Jamkachornkiat 7D (20, as of March 1)

Like some other international tournaments, the Samsung Cup, for example, the Globis Cup is made up of two stages. In the first, the players are split up in to four groups, in which the players play each other in a double knock-out. You qualify for the main tournament when you win two games (one player will do so with a score of 2-0, the other with 2-1). The second stage is then a regular knock-out tournament. Unfortunately, none of the amateur players scored a win. Below are the results in the second stage. Tournament conditions are the same as for the NHK Cup, that is, 30 seconds per move plus ten minutes’ thinking time to be used in one-minute units.

Quarterfinals: Li (China) (W) beat Shibano (Japan) by resig., Byeon (Korea) (W) beat Lin (Ch. Taipei) by resig., Yang (China) (B) beat Shin (Korea) by 7.5 points, Kyo (Japan) (W) beat Lee by resig.
Semifinals: Li (B) beat Byeon by resig., Kyo (B) beat Yang by resig.
Final: Li (B, center) beat Kyo (right) by resig.
Play-off for 3rd place: Byeon (B, left) beat Yang by resig.

In the final, Kyo started fairly well playing white, but he missed the decisive points in large-scale middle-game fighting, so Li took a safe lead. As far as I know, this is Li’s first tournament victory. Kyo had to be satisfied with second place for the second time; he will get one more chance to play in this tournament. Incidentally, both Li and Kyo scored 2-1 in the first stage.

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Nominations open for 2016 AGA Board elections

AGA news - Mon, 09/05/2016 - 20:00
This year four American Go Association (AGA) regional Board of Director seats are in play. The Eastern, Western, Central as well as the membership elected At-Large seats will be selected. The current terms of office expire this September. If you know of someone who you believe would offer guidance and service to the AGA consider making a nomination. Nominations, including self-nominations may be made by full members for the region in which the member resides or nationwide for the At-Large seat and must be received by June 15, 2016. If no nominations are received Donald Trump wins by default. Nominations and questions must be emailed to elections@usgo.org. Click here for complete election information and qualifications.
- Arnold Eudell
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Portland Tourney Results

AGA news - Sat, 07/05/2016 - 23:59

Four schools in Portland competed in a Chess and Go Tournament on April 30th, reports organizer Peter Freedman:  “All together, 8 children played in the Go tournament and 11 in the chess tournament. Taking 1st place again in Go was Olin Wexler, Beverly Cleary, sweeping the tournaments this year. Luke Helprin, Irvington, won the play-off for 2nd/3rd place, beating newcomer Patrick Le from Roseway Heights. Patrick took third place in his first ever Go tournament.  Conall Wilkinson, Richmond, won all four of his games to take first place, and Sam Plager, Irvington was 3-1 to take second. Aiden Harris, Richmond, won third place with a 2-2 record on tie-breaking points. This completes the tournament season for this year. In all, the children played in five Chess and Go Tournaments, with about 125 competitors total in the five tournaments.” Story and photo by Peter Freedman.

 

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The 2nd European Go Grand Slam Tournament Won by Ali Jabarin 1p

European Go Federation - Fri, 06/05/2016 - 18:40
After three rounds of severe competition, Ali Jabarin defeated Artem Kachanovskyi, became the 2nd champion of the European Go Grand Slam tournament. The 3rd place came Pavol Lisy, after winning against Mateusz Surma.
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The Traveling Board: A Tale of Two Games

AGA news - Thu, 05/05/2016 - 04:03

by Phil Straus

In early 1997, I played in a Baltimore tournament as a 45-year-old three-dan. I split the first two games. In my third game I was paired in an even game with a two-dan. Statistically I had about a 2/3 chance of winning. I lost, but what was shocking was that I resigned in less than 30 minutes. I had recently published, with Yilun Yang, Whole-Board Thinking in Joseki. The opening (fuseki) was by far the strongest part of my game. I was ahead at the end of the opening in at least 95% of my tournament games. I was shocked to be so far behind so early in a game. Normally, I have to get to my middle-game weaknesses before I fall behind.

I had spent the previous decade studying intently, hoping to reach the upper levels of amateur play. I looked across the board, and realized my opponent had better potential than I. He was seven years old. I withdrew from the fourth round, went home in time to get a babysitter and go to the movies with my wife. By Monday, I had stopped all my regular lessons and training, and became a full-time photographer.

This past Saturday, I played in the Philadelphia tournament as a 64-year-old two-dan. In my first game, I took six stones from Eric Lui, 1P. I was right. That seven-year-old in 1997 had had more potential. I was delighted that I didn’t lose this game until the fighting in the middle game. The six-stone handicap helped delay my second resignation against this fine player. It was a pleasure to lose again to this young man, who still has such great potential.

Straus is a former president of the American Go Association. He’s at right in the photo above, playing Eric Lui. photo by Henry Hathaway. 

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