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4th SAWMG – Contestants

IGF Ranka - Fri, 17/10/2014 - 00:44
China Zhiying YU ? ? ? Naiwei RUI Age: 17 Age: 22 Age: 17 Age: 29 Age: 50 5 Dan Pro 9 Dan Pro 9 Dan Pro 9 Dan Pro 9 Dan Pro Cat: Women’s Ind./Pair Men’s Team/Pair Cat: Men’s Team Cat: Men’s Team Cat: Women’s Ind. Chinese Taipei Kai-Shin CHANG Li-Hsiang LIN Shih-Iuan CHEN Che-Hao CHANG Joanne MISSINGHAM Age: 34 Age: 31 Age: 29 Age: 28 Age: 20 4 Dan Pro 6 Dan Pro 9 Dan Pro 5 Dan Pro 6 Dan Pro Cat: Women’s Ind./Pair Cat: Men’s Team/Pair Cat: Men’s Team Cat: Men’s Team Cat: Women’s Ind. Europe Russia France Russia Russia Russia Natalia KOVALEVA Hui FAN Svetlana SHIKSHINA Ilya SHIKSHIN Dina BURDAKOVA Age: 27 Age: 32 Age: 34 Age: 24 Age: 27 5 Dan 2 Dan Pro 3 Dan Pro 7 Dan 5 Dan Cat: Women’s Ind./Pair Cat: Men’s Team/Pair Cat: Women’s Ind./Pair Cat: Men’s Team/Pair Cat: Women’s Ind./Pair Russia Alexandr DINERSHTEYN Age: 34 3 Dan Pro Cat: Men’s Team/Pair Japan Rina FUJISAWA Atsushi IDA Yuki SATOSHI Taiki SETO Aya OKUDA Age: 16 Age: 20 Age: 42 Age: 30 Age: 26 2 Dan Pro 8 Dan Pro 9 Dan Pro 7 Dan Pro 3 Dan Pro Cat: Women’s Ind./Pair Cat: Men’s Team/Pair Cat: Men’s Team Cat: Men’s Team Cat: Women’s Ind. Korea Jeong CHOI ? ? ? Chaeyoung KIM Age: 18 Age: 24 Age: 20 Age: 31 Age: 18 Strenght: 5 Dan Pro Strenght: 9 Dan Pro Strenght: 9 Dan Pro Strenght: 9 Dan Pro Strenght: 2 Dan Pro Cat: Women’s Team/Pair Cat: Men’s Team/Pair Cat: Men’s Team Cat: Men’s Team Cat: Women’s Ind. North America Canada USA USA USA Irene SHA Daniel Daehyuk KO Huiren YANG Ming Jiu JIANG Age: 19 Age: 38 Age: 62 Age: 57 6 Dan 7 Dan 1 Dan Pro 7 Dan Pro Cat: Women’s Ind./Pair Cat: Men’s Team/Pair Cat: Men’s Team Cat: Men’s Team

 

Categories: World news

European Student Go Championship 2014

Euro Go TV - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 23:17
Author: Newsbot on 15:41 Thu 09 October 2014

Match Result

Online League Updates - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 13:00
Match now completed between Glasgow and Billericay Dickies in Division 1. The winner of the match was Billericay Dickies.

Match Result

Online League Updates - Thu, 16/10/2014 - 13:00
Match now completed between Belfast and Glasgow in Division 1. The winner of the match was Belfast.

Hungarian Rapid Cup 41-2014

Euro Go TV - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 08:17
Author: Newsbot on 15:14 Tue 07 October 2014

Helsinki Casual 2014

Euro Go TV - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 08:17
Author: Newsbot on 15:14 Mon 06 October 2014

Deskohrani 2014 - Czech Championship Qualification Tournament

Euro Go TV - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 08:17
Author: Newsbot on 15:14 Mon 06 October 2014

XX Cup Of Japan Ambassador in Russia

Euro Go TV - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 08:17
Author: EuroGoTV-Russia on 10:15 Mon 06 October 2014

2. Jenaer Kreuzschnitt 41-2014

Euro Go TV - Wed, 15/10/2014 - 08:17
Author: Newsbot on 00:22 Mon 06 October 2014

Promoting Go at Chinese Cultural Festival in Chicago

AGA news - Tue, 14/10/2014 - 23:05

“Thousands of students, parents, and residents from the Chicago area visited a 4-hour Chinese Cultural Festival on Sept. 27th,” reports organizer Xinming Simon Guo. “This fun and educational event is held to promote Chinese culture and art, and also to celebrate the 10th anniversary of Confucius Institute Day. It is organized by the Confucius Institute in Chicago, Chicago Public Schools, and the Confucius Institute at Valparaiso University. Weiqi/go is one of the most popular booths among 20 different Chinese cultural and art activity booths. As one of the organizers, I couldn’t stay at the booth to promote weiqi as usual. So I turned to the AGA for help. An E-J announcement soliciting help drew two volunteers from the Chicago weiqi community, Nathan and Nicole. They were put in charge of an activity called “Weiqi in 5 minutes” to introduce fundamental rules to passersby. Participants who could solve 80% of the go problems got gift tickets which could be redeemed during the event,” said Guo. CCTV (China Central Television),  the largest network in China, broadcast the cultural festival on its international channel. A one-minute video clip featuring the weiqi booth, is here.  “It is said that CCTV plans to promote more weiqi on their channels,” says Guo. “I believe the major reason is that Xi Jinping, the President of China, knows how to play weiqi, which was confirmed by Nie Weiping 9P.” - Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor, Photo by Xinming Simon Guo: Nathan and Nicole teach kids how to play go.

 

Categories: World news

Berliner Herbstturnier 41-2014

Euro Go TV - Tue, 14/10/2014 - 19:17
Author: Newsbot on 00:21 Sun 12 October 2014

Korean Council Cup 41-2014

Euro Go TV - Tue, 14/10/2014 - 19:17
Author: Newsbot on 00:22 Mon 06 October 2014

Youth Moscow Grand Prix, League Masters, 4th Stage 41-2014

Euro Go TV - Tue, 14/10/2014 - 19:17
Author: Newsbot on 00:21 Mon 06 October 2014

Club Tournament 41-2014

Euro Go TV - Tue, 14/10/2014 - 19:17
Author: Newsbot on 00:21 Mon 06 October 2014

Hans-Pietsch-Memorial 2014

Euro Go TV - Tue, 14/10/2014 - 19:17
Author: Newsbot on 00:21 Mon 06 October 2014

Vologda Go Club Tournament 41-2014

Euro Go TV - Tue, 14/10/2014 - 19:17
Author: Newsbot on 00:21 Mon 06 October 2014

Man v Machine

Euro Go TV - Tue, 14/10/2014 - 19:17
Author: javaness on 22:26 Sun 05 October 2014

Interview with Alexandra Urbán

IGF - Tue, 14/10/2014 - 04:06

This is a continuation of an interview Ranka had with Alexandra when she played in the first World Mind Sports Games in Beijing six year ago. At that time she had interrupted her university studies in Hungary to study go at the International Baduk Academy in Korea. That interview ended with Ranka asking Alexandra what her future plans were. She said she wanted to get stronger at go, see how much progress she had made a year later, and then decide what to do next. What she eventually decided to do was to enroll as a graduate student in Korean literature at a Korean university. Studying Korean literary theory and writing a thesis in Korean left her little time to play go, so when she earned her degree and returned to Hungary, she was playing only at about the 1-dan level. Nevertheless, when a call went out on the Internet for someone to represent Hungary at the 2014 Korea Prime Minister Cup, she answered it.

Ranka: How did you get started playing go?
Alexandra: Actually I got started by accident when I was fifteen. I was looking around on Internet sites, I think Japanese-related sites, and I found this site about go and I got really interested in it. So I started to play on KGS and later looked for some Hungarian players, and that is how I started the game.

Ranka: And how did you come to pursue a graduate degree in Korean literature?
Alexandra: That actually developed from my interest in Korea. After I spent one and a half years in Korea I went back to Hungary and graduated from my university, and after that I went to one of these reading evenings. It was something like a reading circle. They were reading Korean writers' short stories, and I really liked them. I really liked their atmosphere. They were very, like, harmonious. And so when I later applied for a scholarship to Korea, a governmental scholarship, I thought, I could study Korean literature in Korean, which is an asset, and I'm also kind of interested in Korean literature, so why not?

Ranka: Can you tell us about one Korean author that you particularly like?
Alexandra: Of course! To start with, I like female writers a lot, because in Hungary thare are not that many of them; it's still mainly male writers that dominate the scene. One of the writers I like is Kong Ji-young. She's quite famous and has a lot of works in translation. I particularly like her because I wrote my thesis about her. She's one of the first female writers that got really famous. She writes about things in a very female way that I like very much.

Ranka: What does she write about?
Alexandra: Well, she writes about several things, but the short stories I particularly like from her are about making the transfer from the eighties, when Korea was still sort of a dictatorship, to the nineties when they finally became democratized. It became an inner struggle inside Korean people, especially Korean youth, university students. At one time in the eighties they thought that socialism was going to be the way to go, but at the end of the eighties a lot of Eastern European socialist states became democratic. So they had this whole world collapsing inside them. How were they to overcome the collapse?

Ranka: You now work as a translator. Have you translated any go books from Korean into Hungarian?
Alexandra: No, because the go population of Hungary is only about 100 to 150.

Ranka: What do you translate?
Alexandra: Well, right now I'm just starting out, so I'm trying to establish myself as a freelancer. So far I've mostly translated literature, and that's what I'm most interested in. Much of my work has been proofreading translations by Koreans who are translating Hungarian literature into Korean: famous Hungarian writers or famous Hungarian historical books. I've also worked as an interpreter; I interpreted for a well-known writer when he was in Hungary. His name is Yi Mun-yeol and he's very famous in Korea, so I was really happy to have that chance.

Ranka: We wish you good luck in your career.
Alexandra: Thank you.

Postscript: Alexandra scored two wins during the KPMC, over opponents from Austria and Slovakia.

 - Photo: Ito Toshiko

 

Categories: World news

AGA Twitter Account Nears 1,000-Follower Mark

AGA news - Mon, 13/10/2014 - 22:11

The American Go Association’s Twitter account is about to cross the 1,000-follower mark. Those following @theaga are the first to get the AGA’s go news, like Monday’s posting that the 2014 US Open ratings had been released or the Cotsen Open’s request for “Volunteers Needed to help with setup on Friday,October 24, 11am -5pm. Pizza lunch provided.Please contact Samantha at CotsenOpen@gmail.com” Please follow us now @theaga and retweet widely.

Categories: World news

Interview with Andre Connell

IGF - Mon, 13/10/2014 - 22:09

Andre Connell is a Johannesburg-based information technology consultant who represented South Africa at the 2014 Korea Prime Minister Cup in Seoul. Ranka spoke with him after he had played two rounds and split two games with very different Asian opponents.

Ranka: How did you learn about the game of go?
Andre: I learned about the game at Stellenbosch University, which is where I studied. We have a student center where the students can go and get fairly cheap food, and the go club used to meet there. So one evening I walked past and asked the guys, 'What are those? Can you eat them?' Which is kind of the standard question. It started from there and I've been playing ever since.

Ranka: How many years ago was that?
Andre: That was in '95, so it was nineteen years ago.

Ranka: How has go developed in South Africa during those nineteen years?
Andre: It's grown. During the Hikaru no Go phase when everyone was watching the manga, it grew quite a lot. We've kept a few of those players, and I think the general level in South Africa has improved quite a bit. We have one very strong player, Victor Chow, who has been playing in South Africa and is pretty much the strongest guy around in our country, but there are a lot of the rest of us who have also increased our level. I'd say we've got between five and ten players at around the two to four dan level now, which is much better than, let's say, fifteen or twenty years ago when I started, when we had only a couple of dan players. So that's basically where we are at the moment. We're not as strong as many of the European countries, for example, but we're doing fairly well.

Ranka: Does Victor Chow teach the rest of you?
Andre: Yes. We generally play against him in tournaments. Every time you get to a tournament, which can be about two to five times a year, you get to play a game against him, and it's pretty much a teaching game.

Ranka: Do you also go into the places where the original African population lives?
Andre: The townships, for example. One of our strongest clubs is actually in Soweto. We have a couple of players from there who have actually gone to the World Amateur Championships and to the KPMC. I think about seven or eight years ago Julius Paulu went to the World Amateur Champs, and Welile Gogotshe went to the KPMC four years ago. Julius was around 1-dan. He's unfortunately passed away since then, but Welile is one of the strongest players in South Africa. He's probably around 3-dan. He's doing very well.

Ranka: And now, can you tell us about your first game, this morning?
Andre: My first game this morning was against Mongolia. It was quite a tight game. I had a large lead up to about move 100, and then I kept losing little chunks of territory and stones, and eventually managed to sneak it by 2-1/2 points, but it was quite tight at the end. It was one of those that almost got away. At least it was 'almost' -- it didn't get properly away.

Ranka: And what was the story this afternoon?
Andre: I played against the Korean player. He is very strong, quite a few stones stronger than I am, but it was a lot of fun. I tried to attack one of his groups. It didn't work out too well, and then he had one of my groups on the run. It managed to live, but he ended up taking a quarter of the board in return, so he was twenty or thirty points ahead and there was no way I could catch up, unfortunately.

Ranka: Thank you and good luck in the upcoming rounds.

Postscript: In the remaining rounds Andre faced four European opponents and beat one of them to finish 36th.

- Photo: Ito Toshiko

 

Categories: World news
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