News aggregator

Romanian Youth Championship - U8 Qualification 40-2014

Euro Go TV - Thu, 09/10/2014 - 09:17
Author: Newsbot on 00:21 Thu 02 October 2014

Silesian Cup 40-2014

Euro Go TV - Thu, 09/10/2014 - 09:17
Author: Newsbot on 00:21 Thu 02 October 2014

Interview with Jakob Bing

IGF - Thu, 09/10/2014 - 06:53

Sweden's new go champion Jakob Bing has played in two Korea Prime Minister Cups, both times winning three games and finishing near the middle of the field. In 2012, playing as a 2-dan and assisted by a McMahon point, he came in 33rd out of 70. In 2014, now ranked 3-dan, he finished 28th out of 51 without McMahon assistance, the tournament having reverted to the normal Swiss system. Ranka interviewed him shortly after his last game.

Ranka: Can you bring us up to date on the go scene in Sweden?
Jakob: Well, sadly, it seems that go in Sweden has been shrinking. It was more active seven years ago when I started playing. There were more tournaments, with more players. We still have one very big tournament, the Gothenburg open, which gets up to sixty or more participants, but a normal tournament can be like twenty to twenty-five people. The number of tournaments has been shrinking as well. How many do we have left now? I think maybe five or six a year. But a new thing that has started is that we have a summer go camp near Gothenburg, arranged by the Gothenburg go club. This has been very successful for three years in a row. It's very nice, very relaxed, in a nice natural setting near a lake. Quite a lot of people come.

Ranka: To learn how to play better?
Jacob: Yes, to learn, but in a more relaxed atmophere than at a tournament. It's good for people who don't like the competitive atmosphere in tournaments, but they want to meet others and play a lot of go. I think it's a very good thing to have, because it's a different way of playing go together, and some people prefer it.

Ranka: And now please tell us how you feel about your performance here at the KPMC.
Jakob: For some reason, I have been playing much too aggressively. In fact, I've been playing very badly for the past few months, though I've played a bit better in the tournament here. I lost all three games on the first day, but I kind of had strong opponents. Then today I won all three games, for the opposite reason. I guess that if you lose all your games on the first day you can expect to meet weaker people.

Ranka: Which do you think was your best game of the six?
Jakob: Either my first game against the player from Malaysia or my third game against Vesa Laatikainen, from Finland. I think I played best in those games. The third game ended with me dying a lot. I thought I was going to kill my opponent and I tried too hard and everything died. But it was fun.

Ranka: Thank you very much.

Photo: Ito Toshiko

 

Categories: World news

Interview with James Sedgwick

IGF - Tue, 07/10/2014 - 23:20

James Sedgwick is president of the Canadian Go Association, but was competing in the 2014 Korea Prime Minister Cup as a player. Ranka interviewed him at breakfast at the Olympic ParkTel, before the bus ride to the Korea Baduk Association building for the first round.

Ranka: Please tell us about the go community in Canada.
James: Canada is a big country, so it can be hard to get an overall picture of how the community is doing. You notice how one region can have a mini-go-boom for a few years while there's another region where the organizers have fallen away. A lot of Chinese organizations are very active now. There are two or three schools in Toronto that teach kids, mostly Chinese kids from second-generation families, and that's having a big impact. A lot of strong young players are coming in. There was a youth tournament this spring which had forty children under twelve, mostly from these schools.

Ranka: What are the names of these schools?
James: One of them is called the Golden Key Go School, because it operates at the Golden Key Culture Center. They ran the last Toronto Open. Another is just called, in English, the Toronto Go School.

Ranka: And what about the rest of Canada?
James: I think the rest of the community is growing slowly, but when I look at players around my level, about European five dan, there are five to ten of us from a Western background. I don't think there were that many ten or twenty years ago. So it's hard to perceive, but the growth is there.

Ranka: What is it like, trying to organize go in a country as big as Canada?
James: Recently I think we've had a more active executive in the Canadian go organization than we had five or ten years previously, which is a good sign, but it's always a struggle to figure out how you've made a difference at the end of the day. You need the local go communities to do a lot. Well, they're trying, and we're trying too.

Ranka: How was your visit to the Choongam Baduk Academy yesterday?
James: They were very strong, generally stronger than the field here. It was impressive to see. It's always a shock the first time, but I've been to go camps in Shanghai and Beijing -- my wife is originally from Beijing -- so I've had similar experiences elsewhere. It was about what I'd expect at a strong go school here. The intensity of the training the kids go through to get as strong as they are, we're nowhere near that yet in the West.

Ranka: Was it a good warm-up for the KPMC?
James: Oh yes, it got my brain into gear. I'm still thinking through some of the positions in my head. During the tournament I hope I won't make the same mistakes, although I'm sure I'll make make different mistakes.

Ranka: What other hopes and expectations do you have for the KPMC?
James: My hopes are mainly to avoid embarrassment. I'm a little weaker than the last few Canadian representatives. Last year the Canadian representative in the KPMC finished third. I think it's unlikely I'll be able to match that, but my goal is to finish in the top ten.

Ranka: Last year's Canadian representative was Bill Lin. Have you played him very much in Canada?
James: Yes, quite often, in the Canadian Go Association's online Dragon League. That league was created and named by Chuck Elliot, a long-time go organizer in the Canadian prairies who is now in his seventies but doesn't seem able to sit still. I think he's currently involved in setting up some sort of school in China where they teach go and English. I've played Bill maybe five games in the past two years. I don't know that I've been able to win any of them, but I've had chances at fairly late stages in some of the games.

Ranka: Thank you and good luck.

Postscript: After beating Jerusalem Open winner Amir Fragman in round three but losing to the players from China and Chinese Taipei in rounds two and five, James found himself matched against one of Europe's strongest players, Thomas Debarre of France, in round six. The winner of this game would earn an award for placing in the top sixteen. James lost, but still earned an award by placing in the top four in the America and Oceania zone.

- Photo: Ito Toshiko 

 

Categories: World news

Chapter News: Tacoma Club Teaches at Senior Center

AGA news - Tue, 07/10/2014 - 14:00

The Tacoma Go Club held its final event for the recent “Learn Go Week” on September 20 at the Agape Senior Center in Tacoma, Washington. “A great sunny fall afternoon in the Pacific Northwest was enjoyed by newcomers to the newly opened senior center,” reports Tacoma Go Club president Gordon Castanza. After learning the basic rules of go on a 9 x 9 board, some of the fine points of the “Capture Game” were explained on a 19 x 19 demo board.
photo (l-r): Gordon Castanza, Ren Steuernagle , and Tom Cruver. At the end of the event, Reiko Mowery, President Agape Senior Group, and Rina Wariner, Executive Director Agape Senior Group treated the participants to tea and pastries.

Categories: World news

Helsinki Casual 2014

Euro Go TV - Tue, 07/10/2014 - 05:17
Author: Newsbot on 15:14 Mon 06 October 2014

Swindon 40-2014

Euro Go TV - Tue, 07/10/2014 - 05:17
Author: Newsbot on 15:14 Wed 01 October 2014

Kiseido Releases Analysis of First Five Games of Gu Li-Lee Sedol Jubango

AGA news - Tue, 07/10/2014 - 02:49

Just a few weeks after the conclusion of the historic jubango between Gu Li 9P and Lee Sedol 9P, Kiseido is releasing its latest book, which provides an in-depth analysis of the first five games of the historic ‘Death Match’ between two of the strongest go players of the modern era. Having been rivals for many years, with an almost even score of games won against each other in international tournaments, the ten-game match between Korea’s Lee Sedol 9p and China’s Gu Li 9p would definitively decide the ‘best player’ amongst these titans. “Modern Master Games Volume 2: The 2014 Ten-Game Match Between Gu Li and Lee Sedol Part 1: Games One to Five” is compiled and written by Rob van Zeijst, and co-edited by Michael Redmond 9P. Both players are famous for their severe attacks and their fighting skills. Gu has a thick style accompanied by an exquisite feeling for the opening, while Lee plays a fast, profit-oriented game, leaving behind thin positions. This contrast between styles is what made for the innovative and exciting games this year that would decide who will be crowned as the ‘strongest player of the 21st century’. Available ($ 25.00/ € 20.00) on October 15.

Categories: World news

Wax and Murg Win in the West

AGA news - Tue, 07/10/2014 - 02:01

Seth Wax 5d and Aaron Murg 15k won the West American Student Go Championship, held Sept. 27th at the University of California Riverside. Twelve college students competed, in dan and kyu sections. After three intense rounds of playing, Wax, a student at UC Irvine, topped the dan division with a 2-1 score. Murg, from San Diego, won the kyu division with the same record. “It was surprising to see people coming from places so far away to participate in this tournament,” said organizer Yunxuan Li. “Most of the participants came from Santa Monica, and San Diego. Everyone had a lot of fun communicating through go and we want to continue this tournament next year.” - Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor. Photo: From left to right: Yunxuan Li 6d, Seth Wax 5d, Aaron Murg 15k, and Clement Wong 2k

 

Categories: World news

EuroGoTV Update: Spain, United Kingdom, Austria

AGA news - Tue, 07/10/2014 - 02:00

Spain: Juan Sampedro 3k bested Antonio-Eloy Martin 6k at the VI Open Cadiz on September 27 while Juan-Domingo Martin 10k placed third. United Kingdom: Jitka Bartova 1d (left) took The Swindon on September 28. Behind her were Richard Hunter 2d in second and Toby Manning 2d in third. Austria: Also on September 28, The Seewinkel Go tournament finished in Apetlon with Ondrej Kruml 5d in first, Dominik Boviz 4d in second, and Michael Forstenlehner 1k in third.
– Annalia Linnan, based on reports from EuroGoTV, which include complete result tables and all the latest European go news; photo courtesy of EuroGoTV

Categories: World news

Helsinki Casual 2014

Euro Go TV - Mon, 06/10/2014 - 16:17
Author: Newsbot on 15:14 Mon 06 October 2014

Deskohrani 2014 - Czech Championship Qualification Tournament

Euro Go TV - Mon, 06/10/2014 - 16:17
Author: Newsbot on 15:14 Mon 06 October 2014

This Week’s Go Calendar: Rochester and San Diego

AGA news - Mon, 06/10/2014 - 14:22

October 11: Rochester, NY
The Tenth Annual Greg Lefler Memorial Tournament
Steve Colburn tournaments@emptysky.org 585-703-3977

October 11: San Diego, CA
San Diego Go Club Fall Soiree
Ted Terpstra ted.terpstra@gmail.com 619-384-3454

Get the latest go events information.

Categories: World news

2. Jenaer Kreuzschnitt 41-2014

Euro Go TV - Mon, 06/10/2014 - 03:17
Author: Newsbot on 00:22 Mon 06 October 2014

Korean Council Cup 41-2014

Euro Go TV - Mon, 06/10/2014 - 03:17
Author: Newsbot on 00:22 Mon 06 October 2014

Youth Moscow Grand Prix, League Masters, 4th Stage 41-2014

Euro Go TV - Mon, 06/10/2014 - 03:17
Author: Newsbot on 00:21 Mon 06 October 2014

Youth Moscow Grand Prix, 4th Stage 40-2014

Euro Go TV - Mon, 06/10/2014 - 03:17
Author: Newsbot on 15:14 Wed 01 October 2014

Seewinkel Go tournament 2014

Euro Go TV - Mon, 06/10/2014 - 03:17
Author: Newsbot on 15:14 Wed 01 October 2014

Cup of Rivne 2014

Euro Go TV - Mon, 06/10/2014 - 03:17
Author: Newsbot on 15:14 Wed 01 October 2014

Interview with Jimmy Cheng

IGF - Sun, 05/10/2014 - 21:15

Malaysia was represented at the 2014 Korea Prime Minister Cup by the secretary of its weiqi association, Jimmy Cheng (Cheng Khai-yong in Chinese), who also works as a weiqi (baduk, go) teacher. Ranka interviewed Jimmy after his first-round victory over an opponent from Sweden.

Ranka: How did you learn to play go?
Jimmy: I learned because I watched the Hikaru no Go animations. I started when I was fifteen years old, about eleven years ago. At the time, there were hardly any go players in Malaysia, so at first I was just playing by myself, but afterward I managed to find the Malaysian Go Association, which we now call the Malaysia Weiqi Association, so I joined them and started playing competitively.

Ranka: And when did you start teaching?
Jimmy: Teaching? I started teaching in 2010, only four years ago. Before 2010 there was no weiqi teaching in Malaysia. All of the weiqi players were playing on their own. Actually, there was no institute teaching any game like chess or weiqi in Malaysia. Then, suddenly, a chess academy where they taught Chinese chess and international chess appeared, so I approached them and told them I was good at weiqi, and started teaching there. After that, I started recruiting students, and it all grew to the point where now we have three or four weiqi institutes promoting the game, and I'm also going into primary and secondary schools to teach.

Ranka: Are you based in Kuala Lampur?
Jimmy: Yes, I'm based in Kuala Lampur, and most of our main events are held in Kuala Lampur, but the game has started growing in other places too. One place is a chess academy in Ipoh, which is up north of Kuala Lampur. There's someone trying to promote weiqi in every part of Malaysia.

Ranka: How old are your students?
Jimmy: The yougest I've taught is about six years old, but I've also taught a lot of adults. Normally I teach groups of students, mostly in primary and secondary schools. When adults come, often they want to learn so that they can get their sons or daughters to learn. About half the population of Malaysia is Chinese. They migrated into the country from China a long time ago, but they still relate to Chinese culture, so I'm sure they are potentially interested in weiqi. There is just a lack of information about the game, and how to learn it. So to promote our game to them, what I am doing now is to create places for them where they can learn to play.

Ranka: Do you make a good living at this?
Jimmy: For me, it's actually quite good. I don't belong to any one institute. If there's any place where they need someone to teach, I go there. I've been sort of a pioneer. It was quite hard in the beginning, but now, after these few years, I think I earn about the same as a university graduate. I still don't own my own institute, however. I think that if I had my own institute I could do even better. But I just hope I can spread weiqi all around Malaysia, so wherever they need help, I'll go there and provide them with material assistance, with the teaching materials and equipment that they need.

Ranka: And now, can you tell us about the game you just finished in round one?
Jimmy: Well, first of all, my objective here is to beat the players who are ranked at the same strength as me or below. When I play someone above my strength, it may be kind of hard to win. Before the game I checked my opponent's rank and saw that it was 3 dan, the same as me, so I hoped to win and fortunately, I did. I can't say it was a hard game. I'd call it a comfortable win, although he fought a lot.

Ranka: Thank you very much.

Postscript: In his next game Jimmy outdid himself: he upset Thai 5-dan Vorawat Tanapatsopol. Then after losing to two 6-dans and a 4-dan, he won his last game against another 3-dan opponent, Portugal's Daniel Tome. This earned him a well-deserved award as one of the top four players in the Asian zone excluding China, Chinese Taipei, Korea, and Japan.

- Photo: Ito Toshiko

 

Categories: World news
Syndicate content