Environmental Go Game

214 moves

214 moves

 

BlackWhite
2019½
1918½
1817½
1716½
1615½
1514½
14move in empty corner
13½13
move in empty cornermove in empty corner
12½move in empty corner
1211½
 
12-move sequence on one side of board
 
11one move
10½ 
 
 10
9
one moveone move
8
7
one move
one move6
two moves
 
three moves
5
 
35 moves
 
 4
 
seven moves
 
 
 
eight moves
 
3 
 
seven moves
 
 
four moves
 2
 
 
13 moves
 
1 
 
nine moves
 
½ 
 
twelve final moves
 
TotalsBlackWhite
Cards2218
Card points223187
Area166195
Prisoners3540
Territory2949
Komi 
Area+Card points+Komi389391½
Prisoners+Territory+Card points+Komi287285½

Under area scoring (as with the SST rules, which were in use) White wins by 2½ points.
Under territory scoring Black wins by 1½ points.

My count is slightly different from the official one. No doubt I have miscounted. My conclusion is the same: White wins by area rules, Black wins by territory (Japanese) rules.

Some uninformed comments: the rules

The game was played under area rules (SST).

The play in the yose suggests that the players thought they were using territory rules.

A move played under area rules is worth one more point than if played under territory rules, when compared with tokens.

Therefore there is an uncertainty of one point in any conclusions drawn from the taking of the tokens.

Moreover, The SST rules for handicap stones give Black the extra points for the extra stones, while orthodox Chinese rules don't. Both players are familiar with orthodox Chinese rules, and may have assumed that the extra white stones played would be counted as handicap stones.

More uninformed comments: the game

I observe that there was a tendency for White to "follow the lead" of Black. There were six sequences of the form card-move-move-card or move-card-card-move, and in five of these it was Black who twice changed the "lead" and White who followed.

If I did not know who the players were, I might guess from this that Black was male, and White was female and was allowing herself to be pushed around. In fact, Rui Naiwei is far too strong a Go player, and far too strong a character, for this conclusion to be appropriate.


Professor Berlekamp's commentary on the game.



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